Psychopomp
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PsychoPomp

 

DANCE THEATER

 

ABOUt 

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artistic Director

Shenandoah Harris was born and raised in Denver, Colorado. From a young age she was involved in both Theater and Dance. She received her BFA in Dance from University California, Santa Barbara under the direction of Christopher Pilafian, Nancy Colahan, Jerry Pearson, Christina Mccarthy, Mira Kingsley and Valerie Huston. In her senior year she was invited to be a member of the UCSB Dance Company, which toured in California and internationally through Cyprus, Prague and Italy. As a member of the UCSB Dance Company she performed in many pieces including the soloist role in Jose Limon's work Dances For Isadora: Maenad. She was also asked to set a work on the company for their tour. Shenandoah received a second degree in Theater Production and Design and currently works as a freelance Lighting Designer. Shenandoah is also a performing and teaching member of The Diavolo Institute.

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The Company

Shenandoah founded Psychopomp Dance Theater in 2017. The company seeks to create movement that is born from production and design elements, transporting the audience. Through collaboration, the company works to break free from the habitual ways the body moves. Focusing on authentically soulful and deeply spiritual movement qualities the movement style is highly athletic, raw, grounded and visceral. The material can be described as a mix of modern, contemporary, acrobatic and capoeira styles. Psychopomp works to connect not only physically and emotionally but also spiritually to each other and the work they create, allowing a space for the audience to witness and reflect upon the core ideas and questions around what it is to be human. Pyschopomp is committed to new movement innovation and melding of the elements of design, allowing the work to engage all different types of viewers in a new and direct way.

 

DANCERS

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MaijaLisa Miltz

MaijaLisa Miltz began dancing at the age of 3. She has trained in a variety of styles including tap, hip-hop, contemporary, ballet, and more. She grew up in Massachusetts, and upon graduating from Pioneer Valley Performing Arts High School in 2014, it has been her goal to make dancing into a career. She has worked with Michelle Dorrance in a restaging of Sound Space and has also taught at the School for Contemporary Dance and Thought, located in Northampton Massachusetts. MaijaLisa lives in Los Angeles, and is currently working for SIZA Dance Company and Psychopomp Dance Theater.

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Kaycee Janino

Kaycee Jannino grew up in a small town just north of Boston, Massachusetts where she trained primarily in Ballet, Jazz, Musical Theatre, Lyrical, and Hip Hop. Before starting her college career, Kaycee became a certified instructor by the Dance Teacher’s Club of Boston and the American Society. After studying Exercise Science and Dance at Jacksonville University, Kaycee transferred to Santa Barbara City College which is where she found her passion for Modern and Contemporary dance. While in Santa Barbara, she performed with Weslie Ching Dance, Nebula Dance Lab, and SBCC Dance Company. Kaycee is currently dancing with SBCC Dance Company under the direction of Tracy R. Kofford, Sean Greene’s Shield Wall Dance Company, as well as FUSE Dance Company and Psychopomp Dance Theater.

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Andrew Corpuz

Andrew Corpuz grew up in Ukiah California and did not begin training in movement until 2009 where he was first exposed to Capoeria and Musical Theater. In 2013 Andrew attended CSU Fullerton and made the decision to pursue a degree in Dance. While at CSUF he had the opportunity to train with Collin Conner and perform Conner’s piece August at ACDA, the Kennedy Center in D.C and in 2016, Jacob’s Pillow. Upon graduation in 2016 Andrew was offered a position as a performer and teacher on The Diavolo Institute. Through working with Diavolo Dance Theater Andrew has most recently had the opportunity to perform with them on America’s Got Talent 2017 and is currently working on “The Veteran’s Project: A Long Journey Home”. He joined Psychopomp Dance Theater in June of 2017.

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Emily Krause

Emily Krause, a native of the Pacific Northwest, began training as a gymnast at the age of three. Her acrobatic training remains a large influence in her artistic approach to movement. In addition to gymnastics training, Emily attended Vancouver School of Arts and Academics in Vancouver, WA. There she learned how important arts and academic education integration is. To further her interest in professional dance she pursued an apprenticeship position with A-WOL Dance Collective, an aerial dance company in Portland, OR where she performed in various productions with the company such as their annual outdoor performance Art in the Dark. Emily received her BFA (2017) in Dance Performance and Choreography from California Institute of the Arts. During her undergrad studies she was lucky enough to be an exchange student at London Contemporary Dance School in London, UK. Currently, Emily holds the position of teaching artist with the DIAVOLO Institute.

Performances

Synthesis V Festival—> August 25th and 26th @ Curtis Hall in BREA 

 

RAW ARTISTS Los Angeles—> September 19th

Short and Sweet Film and Dance Festival—> October 13th-14th

HIghway's performance space may 2019

 NEWS

Front & Main Festival 2018--> Second Place winner

 Repertory show march 2019

Company Class

Sunday Evening open company class in DTLA. Email for more details!

 

Audition

Interested in getting involved? Contact shenharris@gmail.com

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Projects

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WYRD (2018)

wyrd focuses on the power, pain and delicacy that resides in the primal and spiritual aspects of womanhood. This trio of three power women explores these topics through high risk, athletic and emotional movement. How do women negotiate the inner strength that comes from the pain we experience and learn to appreciate and take control of that power? Highlighted as “the most memorable work of the night” in the Synthesis v festival 2018.

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Desperantium(2018)

Desperantium takes its inspiration from Auguste Rodin’s work The Gates of Hell. The choreographic material is drawn from the intricately beautiful body shapes of both the male and female figures, the exhibition of raw human emotion and the backstory of Dante’s Inferno. Rather than a specific story, the work creates a landscape for the dancers and the audience to confront their relationships not only with one another but with their spirituality and mortality

Anomie (2017)

Anomie, the title of the piece, is defined as the condition where society creates a structure where humans feel no moral obligation towards one another. This clash between a personal moral compass and society's moral compass leads to widespread suffering. Anomie focuses on existential fears and invasive thoughts and how these concepts can cause individuals to behave in society. inspiration was drawn from frank auerbach's paintings as well as literature on invasive thoughts and ocd. through collaboratively generating imaginative and spiritually authentic movement this piece allows the viewer to reflect on the world around them. can we create a world governed by morality?

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From The Great Above to the Great Below (2016)

From The Great Above to the Great Below is a piece based on joeseph CAMPBELL'S THE HERO'S JOURNEY AS WELL AS THE TALE OF INNANA. This piece tells the story of three women who take on a challenging journey to a rite of initiation through the application of gold paint to their bodies, weaving and intermingled partnering and weight sharing as well as sweepingly powerful movements that explode across the space.

Nefesh|ruach|neshamah(2016)

Nefesh | Ruach | Neshamah was created around specific scenic, lighting and costume design choices. the movement was generated from working with long billowing skirts, huge panels of white fabric hanging down in the space. These white diaphanous panels of fabric are evocative of the separation of realities and reference the allegory of the Plato’s cave, as the dancers are both real and visible at times, and mere shadows in other moments. This piece is set in an otherworldly space, where the dancers explore a new landscape and new relationships with one another.

 

Contact

For questions and booking 

 

Email: psychopompdance@gmail.com

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